Article Category: Funereal Friday

Undertakers Progress

Posted Friday, Jun 12

Rubber-Tired Carriages for Church Aisles are New Invention

Among the many new appliances of the up-to-date undertakers is the casket carriage, upon which a burial casket may be moved up the aisle of a church, says the Passaic, N.J. News

One is used in St. Nicholas’ Church regularly. The latest form of casket carriage is a lattice construction of brass. It is supported upon six low rubber-tired wheels three on a side.  When not in use it can be closed up together, occupying a small space; when opened for use it is of ample size to bear a casket, which can be moved upon it securely, smoothly and noiselessly along the aisle. 

It is not expected that the casket carriage will take the place of bearers in military and other formal funerals in which bearers would naturally be employed, but it is found useful in other church funerals, and especially, as in St Nicholas, where there are narrow aisles, in which there might not be room for bearers to walk at the side of the casket.

The truck here mentioned is the new Springfield combined casket carriage, “built like a bridge,” and, turning on its axle, gives the operator perfect control.

These trucks are made of solid brass, steel, oxidized bronze, and steel, nickel plated, and range from $35 to $45. They are just as desirable for a house as a church funeral. The Springfield (Ohio) Silver Plate Co. also makes ten different styles of brass oxidized and nickel finished folding pedestals the handsomest articles ever placed before the trade. 

Another specialty consists of their high grade casket hardware, from the original Pairpoint molds and dies.  Their products are for sale by all first-class jobbers. Write for catalogue and price.

Patents issued and patents allowed, Nov. 22, 1898, March 14, 1899, May 10, 1899.

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